It is currently Thu Nov 21, 2019 1:21 pm
Board index » Talking About Stuff » Good Tech



Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 21 posts ] 
Author Message

Offline
User avatar

Joined: Wed Feb 06, 2013 8:54 pm
Posts: 1447
Vehicle: 91 Tin Top

Post Posted: Thu Mar 05, 2015 6:46 pm 
Reply with quote Top  
This guide is for replacing the low range gears in the standard push button transfer case on VVT Jimnys built after 2005.
You can also use this guide for installing the High/Low gear sets (Trailjimny) into push button transfers. But you won’t need to follow the whole process.

Pre 2005 Jimnys have the lever operated transfer case which is totally different to the push button cases. Not only for the shift mechanism, but pre 2005 transfers have a planetary gear that is not in the push button transfer cases.

Image

Image

These low only reduction gear sets have been on the market for a while and they offer a solution for those Jimny owners who are not running big tyres and don’t need to change their highway revs, but are looking to improve the off road ability of their vehicles.

I have installed the Zeal 77% low only gears, but ProTrack now also make a set with 70% low only reduction. The replacement procedure is the same for both options.

My Jimny is a 2011 build and the manual number 9951-81A10-01E was correct for my transfer case, if you want to search online for it.

The factory service manual for the new model Jimnys has very clear diagrams and descriptions for the transfer case. The transfer dis-assembly and re-assembly guide in the manual is good, but some minor details are not covered and I believe pictures always make things a bit clearer.

Tools you’ll need;
• Metric sockets and spanners
• 27mm socket and breaker bar or handle extension for cracking flange nuts
• Tension/torque wrench
• Hammer
• Flat blade screw driver or small cold chisel
• Hex drive bit or allan key
• Needle nose pliers
• Pin punches
• Bearing pullers and access to a decent hydraulic press
• Feeler gauges
• Dremel or multi tool (with jigsaw type blade)

Extra bits and pieces;
• Loctite
• Gasket sealant
• Tie wire and cable ties
• Good quality, high temp bearing grease
• 80W-90 diff oil

*Note;
The manual says to have the transfer in 4H before removing the case.
There are advantages and disadvantages to have the case in 4wd before disconnecting.
I did this work with my transfer in 2wd and I think it made a couple of steps easier than it would be if it was in 4H. There are just a couple of points that are different and I will note them in here.

To start;
Drain transfer oil, disconnect negative side of battery and raise vehicle.
I like my Jimny to be sitting on 4 car stands and keeping the wheels on, there’s plenty of room to work and I feel much safer being under the car like this.
Image

Mark all flanges and slip joints on shafts.
Image


Remove heat shield to get access to remove the sensor on top of cat convertor.
Image


Loosen but don’t totally remove the 2 spring bolts on each end of the exhaust section (after manifold and before muffler). You may need the breaker bar to crack these bolts.
Then remove the 2 rubber mounts.
Image


Remove the 4 spring bolts and take out this section of exhaust.
Image

Remove all bolts from all 3 shafts and tie them up out of the way with zip ties or wire.
*Note;
If doing in 2wd you will need a bar to lock the front output shaft while removing bolts. But it will not turn if in 4H.

Disconnect all electrical plugs.
Image


Undo and remove the 3 rubber transfer case mounts.
On my vehicle there was long screws through the cover plate on the floor where the transfer leaver would be on older models. These screws hit the top of the case when trying to lift it off the mounts.
If you take off the 3 rubber mounts it makes it easier to lift, turn and get the case passed the chassis mounts.
The case is not that heavy and I removed mine on my own with a couple of straps for safety.
Just keep an eye on the 4wd switch cables at the front of the case if you use straps too.
Image

Image


Then case is lowered down onto some cardboard and slid it out from under the car with no damage.
Image


This pin supports the short selector arm, it doesn’t really matter when you remove it, but it needs to be out once you’ve removed the selectors.
The manual says to do it last, but I took it out at the start while I had the case upside down and it didn’t cause any issues.
Image


Then remove the 4wd switch and steel ball bearing.
Image


For most of the work that needs to be done it’s easy to work on the case when clamped vertically like this, just don’t put too much force on the mounting bracket.
Image

Remove speed sensor.
Image


Remove triangular cover on actuator to expose the shifter pinion gear.
*Note;
The position shown is with shifter in 2wd, it will be different if you are in 4H.
I think this is the best position as it is easy to see if the selector is in the correct position when re-assembling.

Take note of the circle mark on the pinion gear.
As mine was in 2wd the selector shaft was fully retracted out of the case and I noted the pinion gear mark in relation to the last tooth on the selector shaft. This made it easy to put back exactly the same and know the selector was exactly right.
Image


Undo the 3 bolts joining the black plastic cover of the shift actuator to the alloy housing. Rotate the plastic cover as shown in picture. This takes the pressure off the pinion gear and makes it very easy to remove the gear.
Warning: Do not remove the plastic cover, it is spring loaded!!!!
Just turn it, remove the gear, then turn back and refit the 3 bolts immediately.
Image


Open the 2 caulked points on all 3 x flange nuts (Small cold chisel, flat blade screw driver or tapered pin punch can be used). The better job you do of opening the nuts, the easier it is to get them off.

Find a way to lock the flange and use 27mm socket with breaker bar to crack flange nut.
To lock the flange I just used a piece of 50x3mm flat bar with 2 holes drilled and clamped it in the bench vice. This simple brace worked fine for me.
Image


Remove all 3 flanges.
You may need bearing pullers to get them off the shafts.
Image


Remove the complete shift actuator assembly.
*Note;
You need to have the actuator off to get access to the bolt (red arrow) that holds the cover over the 4L switch (blue arrow). Just take note of this point and remember it for later.
Image


Remove 4L switch and ball bearing.
Image


Split the case.
There is 3 tabs cast into the case that make it easy to prise it open, just go steady moving each side a little bit at first until gasket has let go all the way around.
Image

Remove speed sensor gear and steel ball bearing. The ball is under the raised section of the sensor (blue arrow).
Image


Remove input shaft, chain and output gear as an assembly. The output thrust bearing is also shown in this photo.
*Note;
If you are doing a High/Low gear reduction I believe this is as far as you need to go.
From what I’ve seen you will be replacing these 2 gears and then you can re-assemble the case.
Image


Now you have a clear view of the low range gears that need to be changed.
Starting with the counter gear in the centre of the case.
Image


Then the remove the output shaft assembly (with low range gear) and shifters all together.
Image


*Note;
Here is the main difference between doing this in 2wd or 4H.
This is my assembly in 2wd, note the selectors in relation to the clips.
With the gears in 2wd this complete assembly is all held together, you need to manually move the alloy selector out to touch the outside clip (4H positon), this lets the gears come out from the selectors.
Image


Diagram showing 2wd function. Note the selectors and clips as well as the pinion gear (5) and long shaft is fully retracted.
Image


Remove front output assembly. Leaving bearing and cir-clip fitted in the case.
Image


Remove cir-clip from main output shaft. Needle nosed pliers worked well for me.
Note the flat face on clutch hub assembly that goes against the cir-clip.
Image

With clamp plate from bearing puller and a hydraulic press remove low range gear.
Image


Low gear assembly split apart.
Image


Old 44 tooth gear and new 50 tooth gear.
Image


Right at this point I found out how fast the ball bearings go flying out of the clutch hub sleeve.
If you go through this whole job and don’t have the bearings shot out across the room, you’re a bloody legend.
If you a mortal like me you might find this tip handy.
After you’ve chased the little ball bearings all over the shed and got them back into the hub. Start with the sleeve pushed down on the shaft and get a thick zip tie to hold them in place while you pull the sleeve back over them. You just need to give each ball a light push in as you pull the sleeve over it, then make sure all each key is pushed back down before pulling the sleeve back up into place and removing the zip tie. Then repeat this each time the balls go flying out, I can say from experience that they can easy go 10 meters or more.
Image

Image

Make sure you have the sleeve the right way before refitting with ball bearings.
Image


Insure to fit new gear and front drive clutch hub in correct direction as shown in photos above.
Press assembly back together using the bearing puller clamp and sleeve over shaft (this socket wasn’t deep enough, needed to use a proper sleeve).
Image


Press hub until it bottoms out on the shaft, but don’t force it.
I ended up with 0.15mm between the low range gear and the clutch hub. The manual doesn’t give a clearance for this assembly, so I think as long as you press the clutch hub all the way home and the low range gear can spin freely its ok.
Image

Image

Pull bearings off the counter gear.
Image

Image


Old and new counter gears (New has the smallest gear).
Image

Image


Press bearings onto new counter gear.
Image


Just to show where the new low range gear hits the steel selector.
Image


The steel selector arm needs to move about 15mm or so closer to the alloy selector arm.
Image

File down the steel selector arm something like this.
Image


The gear needs to spin freely when in low range.
Push selectors together. There’s a trick to pulling the long selector shaft while pushing the selector arm, but you’ll get it.
It is in low range when you can see this groove (red arrow).
Image


The case also needs a very small trim.
This is the standard gear and the piece to be trimmed.
Image


I laid a cloth rag inside the case covering the bearing and as much of the bottom of the case as possible. Then used a multi tool with jigsaw type blade for trimming the small piece of alloy off.
Trimmed complete and new gear fitted.
Image


The rag kept the bearing clear of metal shavings, but I wasn’t happy with the bits stuck around the thin steel oil guides.
My wife had this brilliant idea that worked perfectly. So I took off the metal guides that you can see in this photo and cleaned it up nicely with the cotton tips to get in all the tight corners.
Image


Once the case is totally clean it’s time to start assembly.

Firstly, line up all the parts on the bench and check every piece off with the exploded component diagram. Note the selector position and clips on selectors as noted earlier.
Then oil or grease each piece as recommended.
Image


*Note;
This will save you a lot of heartache.
When fitting the low gear and main shaft assembly it needs to be carried by the long selector shaft (red arrow) and the short selector shaft needs to be supported (green line) when fitted inside the case.
If you let the short selector shaft drop down inside the case the front output ring will go past the ball bearing (orange circle) and they will fly out, again and again and again, until you support the short shaft.
Image


The short shaft is supported by the round pin as shown in this diagram, but if you try and fit the round pin before the shafts it can go too far in and stop the long shaft seating properly.
Image


Use a pin punch (or small screw driver) to support the short shaft while test fitting the gears and making sure you’ve trimmed and filed everything properly.
Image


Use high temp bearing grease on the rubber seal before fitting the front output assembly.
Image


Fit front output flange and tighten to 130Nm with tension wrench. Caulk flange nut with pin punch.
Image


Oil front drive clutch hub assembly, then assemble main output shaft and selectors noting selector positions and clips.
Image


Fit main shaft assembly, selectors and counter gear into case.
*Note;
The new bigger low gear covers the counter gear bearing (red arrow), both pieces need to be installed together.
This can be done with one person.
By holding the long selector shaft then leaning the counter gear back (green arrow) while fitting the main shaft into the front output assembly, then lean the counter shaft back vertical to drop everything into the housing.
It’s not as hard as it sounds.
Image


Remember to support the short shaft while fitting the gears.
Then oil and fit the needle rollers and thrust bearing.
Image


Thrust bearing direction.
Image


Fit the input shaft, chain and output gear as an assembly.
The bearing on the input shaft will need a tap with a hammer to fit it into the case. Don’t smack it, small taps work much better.

*Note;
Make sure the case is supported properly when fitting the bearing.
Make sure the chain is not pulling the input shaft over and check you are fitting the shaft straight.
Image


Fit speed sensor gear and steel ball bearing, then clean both sides of the case before adding gasket sealant and closing up the case.
Image

Remember that bolt (red arrow) that holds the cover over the 4L switch (blue arrow) that goes under the actuator?
You should fit that and the sensor before you fit the actuator and Loctite the bolt as shown in this photo. Because it’s too late when you realise after you’ve fitted the pinion gear and sealed the pinion gear cover back on.
Image


If you do forget about that bolt and the cover and the sensor you can just fold up the tab like I did. If you ever have to split the case again in years to come it will remind you not to do it again.
Image


Remove the 3 bolts on the plastic actuator cover, turn and fit the pinion gear.
*Note;
Hold the plastic cover while you’re fitting the pinion gear so you don’t push the cover off while pushing the gear on.
Image


Note the positon of the pinion gear and the tooth position on the selector shaft.
I found it was easy to use a flat blade screw driver to push the selector shaft all the way out of the case and make sure it was in the 2wd positon correctly.
Image

Clean old gasket sealant off the pinion gear cover and housing before adding new sealant and fitting cover.

Fit 4wd switch and run cable up to main connector plate.
Image


Fit selector support pin and add Loctite to thread before fitting pin cover.
Image


Make sure 4L switch cable is run behind cover and under actuator.
Image


Fit speed sensor.
Image

The case is now ready to fit back into the vehicle.

I needed a hand to get the case back up on the mounts, it would be possible to do it on your own, but it would be tricky.

Following the removal steps in reverse, fit the;
• Case on the rubber mounts
• 3 shafts matching the flange marks (put gearbox in neutral to line up the rear output)
• All electrical connections
• Exhaust pipe section
• Sensor on cat convertor

Once everything is fitted and all bolt tightened to correct torque, fill transfer case with good quality 80W-90 oil and reconnect the battery.

Lower vehicle off car stands, start up and drive to nearest 4wd track to start enjoying your Jimny with it's totally awesome new low range. :peaceout:


Last edited by pete_79 on Tue Oct 10, 2017 7:30 pm, edited 1 time in total.
 Profile  

Offline
az supporter
az supporter
User avatar

Joined: Fri Jun 06, 2014 9:26 am
Posts: 849
Vehicle: 2000 Jimny

Post Posted: Thu Mar 05, 2015 7:32 pm 
Reply with quote Top  
great work making the effort to write that up !

 Profile  

Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sat May 26, 2007 12:00 am
Posts: 60
Location: Spain
Vehicle: Jimny 1.3 - NGV 3door 1.9ddis

Post Posted: Fri Mar 06, 2015 1:40 am 
Reply with quote Top  
A great work!!!

 Profile  

Offline
Platinum Supporter
Platinum Supporter
User avatar

Joined: Tue Dec 06, 2011 10:00 am
Posts: 2154
Location: Nhulunbuy 0880
Vehicle: 2010 jimny

Post Posted: Fri Mar 06, 2015 11:06 am 
Reply with quote Top  
brilliant write up great pics. whered you get a copy of the VVT service manual? is it available so to speak?

_________________
your daily dose of questionable sanity

 Profile WWW  

Offline
User avatar

Joined: Wed Feb 06, 2013 8:54 pm
Posts: 1447
Vehicle: 91 Tin Top

Post Posted: Fri Mar 06, 2015 12:36 pm 
Reply with quote Top  
Thanks mate.

You have a pm. ;)


Last edited by pete_79 on Sat Mar 07, 2015 6:50 pm, edited 1 time in total.
 Profile  

Offline
az supporter
az supporter
User avatar

Joined: Fri Jul 22, 2011 11:39 am
Posts: 1009
Location: Melbourne
Vehicle: Suzuki Jimny 2009

Post Posted: Fri Mar 06, 2015 9:55 pm 
Reply with quote Top  
Fantastic write up Pete. This will come in handy one day when I am retired and have time for this stuff. I have book marked it now so I can find it again. Very interesting to see the whole disassembly and reassembly process.

Can you also PM me about the manual please when you get time. You mention 9951-81A10-01E and that is one I don't have and a Google search does not bring it up, in fact your post above is the only place I find it using Google.

Thanks

Mike

 Profile  

Offline
User avatar

Joined: Wed Feb 06, 2013 8:54 pm
Posts: 1447
Vehicle: 91 Tin Top

Post Posted: Sat Mar 07, 2015 6:20 am 
Reply with quote Top  
Thanks Mike.
I searched for ages trying to find photos of inside the push button transfer cases, but couldn't find much.
So I thought I'd write this up to help others that want to work on these transfers.

With the manual, Google is on a moral crusade to hide torrents as much as they can. I had to go to about page 15 of the search results before it started giving me links to the sites I wanted.

I'm heading out for a wheel now, but will send you a PM when I'm back at my computer.

 Profile  

Offline
az supporter
az supporter
User avatar

Joined: Fri Jul 22, 2011 11:39 am
Posts: 1009
Location: Melbourne
Vehicle: Suzuki Jimny 2009

Post Posted: Sun Mar 08, 2015 7:55 pm 
Reply with quote Top  
Got the PM thanks Pete. Now I have to consult with a Gen Y person to work out what to do next but we have some of those at work.

 Profile  

Offline
User avatar

Joined: Wed Feb 06, 2013 8:54 pm
Posts: 1447
Vehicle: 91 Tin Top

Post Posted: Mon Mar 09, 2015 8:20 am 
Reply with quote Top  
Unfortunately at the moment there aren't any websites like Rhinoman's where you can just click and download the new manual without needing other software.
Flick me a PM if you can't get any help from the Gen Ys at work.



I've been out for a test run with the new gears and they are awesome.
It's like a whole new car off road now.

There is no change in 2wd or 4H, it drives exactly the same as standard, but what a difference in low range.
You have time to pick proper lines as you're crawling along.
You're not bouncing around and popping over everything and traction is so much better now that you're not spinning the wheels trying to keep the revs up to not stall.
And one other big thing I noticed is no more burning the clutch when you need to just inch your way over an obstacle.

I believe this is one of the best mods you can do if you want to wheel your Jimny properly.
Cost wise I believe it's comparable to getting a 3 inch lift kit out of the UK, but I think the gears are probably a better investment.
With the exchange rate and what ever factory deals where happening at the time, these gears cost me ~$900 landed to my door and with the guide above you should be able to fit them over a weekend.

 Profile  

Offline
az supporter
az supporter
User avatar

Joined: Fri Jul 22, 2011 11:39 am
Posts: 1009
Location: Melbourne
Vehicle: Suzuki Jimny 2009

Post Posted: Tue Mar 10, 2015 7:20 pm 
Reply with quote Top  
Can this one get moved into the "How To" section?

 Profile  

Offline
User avatar

Joined: Wed Jan 07, 2015 10:51 pm
Posts: 23
Vehicle: Jimny!

Post Posted: Tue Mar 24, 2015 10:13 pm 
Reply with quote Top  
Brilliant write up!!! I've read a few tutorials in my time and this has to be one of the best.

I'm stuffed if I can find the VVT manual though, I only get about 5 hits on google and 3 are this thread. Could you please PM me a link?

 Profile  

Offline
User avatar

Joined: Wed Feb 06, 2013 8:54 pm
Posts: 1447
Vehicle: 91 Tin Top

Post Posted: Wed Mar 25, 2015 3:20 pm 
Reply with quote Top  
Click to download Suzuki Jimny Manual

Due to all the requests about the latest service manual; I've made the above link available for now. I'm not maintaining this link and can't say how long it will be available for.
If you want a factory service manual for your Jimny (right up to the current model) download it and save it to your computer from here while you can.



Hopefully someone around here with a service manual page on their website :wink: will get this uploaded to their server sooner rather then later.

 Profile  

Offline

Joined: Thu Nov 05, 2009 11:00 pm
Posts: 466
Location: Tasmania

Post Posted: Fri Apr 03, 2015 10:08 pm 
Reply with quote Top  
Excellent write up mate! Thanks for taking the time and effort to do all this! One question though, who/where did you import/buy your gears from? buggered if I can find a useful link that is in English?

Cheers, Simon.

 Profile  

Offline
User avatar

Joined: Wed Feb 06, 2013 8:54 pm
Posts: 1447
Vehicle: 91 Tin Top

Post Posted: Wed Apr 08, 2015 5:19 pm 
Reply with quote Top  
superduki wrote:
Excellent write up mate! Thanks for taking the time and effort to do all this! One question though, who/where did you import/buy your gears from? buggered if I can find a useful link that is in English?

Cheers, Simon.


Thanks for the feedback mate.
Sorry for the late reply, but I've just got back from 6 days in the Snowies/VIC high country testing out the new gears.

After the drive we did this weekend I have to say this is the best mod I've done on our little rig.
I had the misses and the kids in the Jimny and had to crawl down several long steep clay tracks in the thumping rain, I didn't have to touch the brakes once on the descents and felt in total control the while time.
I'll throw some pics from the trip up in my build thread when I get a chance later.

To answer your questions;
I got the gears through Jesse Streeter
He was brilliant to deal with, I sent him an email and clearly described my model Jimny (Type 5 or later with manual gear box and push button transfer case).
He replied about an hour later with a quote and a description of the parts from Prostaff.
I accepted his quote, transferred the money into his account and about 4 days later got an email from him to say he had the parts at his warehouse and he gave me a fixed price quote for the shipping and his commission, I accepted his prices and transferred the money.
Then 3 days later the parts landed at my door, packed perfectly and they where exactly what I asked for.
It was stress free shopping and awesome service with Jesse, I will be using him again for sure.

As for links;
Google and Bing are pretty good at translating the Japanese sites.

This is the gears that I got; 77% Low only
This is the other set available from Japan; 15% H and L
This is the link that I sent to Jesse in my original email and said I needed the second generation type and wanted option 3; PDF

 Profile  

Offline

Joined: Wed Apr 23, 2014 1:06 pm
Posts: 143
Vehicle: Suzuki Jimny

Post Posted: Fri Apr 10, 2015 3:59 pm 
Reply with quote Top  
awesome write up, i just unbolted the brackets over removing the exhaust...

:)

 Profile  

Offline

Joined: Thu Nov 05, 2009 11:00 pm
Posts: 466
Location: Tasmania

Post Posted: Sun Apr 12, 2015 5:52 pm 
Reply with quote Top  
Cheers mate, great helpful link, thanks!

Simon.

 Profile  

Offline
az supporter
az supporter
User avatar

Joined: Sun Feb 08, 2009 11:00 pm
Posts: 9001
Location: Brisneyland
Vehicle: 2006 Jimny JLX

Post Posted: Tue Jul 14, 2015 8:22 pm 
Reply with quote Top  
I only just saw this what a brilliantly detailed 'how to', well done Pete. Had to smile when I saw the straps holding up the TC and the cardboard to drag it out, I'm a bit rougher than you I think.


Suzuki, way of life

_________________
Click WWW below for STICKERS

 Profile WWW  

Offline
User avatar

Joined: Wed Feb 06, 2013 8:54 pm
Posts: 1447
Vehicle: 91 Tin Top

Post Posted: Tue Jul 14, 2015 9:24 pm 
Reply with quote Top  
:lol: Thanks mate. :)
Now that I know how heavy the case isn't, I don't know if I would bother with the straps if I had to do this again.
But I would still use the cardboard to drag it out. :wink:

 Profile  

Offline
az supporter
az supporter
User avatar

Joined: Sun Feb 08, 2009 11:00 pm
Posts: 9001
Location: Brisneyland
Vehicle: 2006 Jimny JLX

Post Posted: Wed Jul 15, 2015 7:30 am 
Reply with quote Top  
haha, yep. I just drop it onto my chest, then slide it onto the ground and drag it out with no cardboard assistance... my bad!

_________________
Click WWW below for STICKERS

 Profile WWW  

Offline
User avatar

Joined: Wed Feb 06, 2013 8:54 pm
Posts: 1447
Vehicle: 91 Tin Top

Post Posted: Tue Oct 10, 2017 7:34 pm 
Reply with quote Top  
Phuck Photobucket!!

I've fixed the image links on this thread.
If Imgur decide they want to be asshats as well in the future I doubt I'll bother doing it all again....

 Profile  

Online
User avatar

Joined: Sun Nov 22, 2015 5:22 pm
Posts: 19
Vehicle: 2015 Suzuki Jimny

Post Posted: Wed Oct 11, 2017 9:44 am 
Reply with quote Top  
Thanks for taking the time.

 Profile  
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 21 posts ] 

Jump to:  


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Google [Bot] and 57 guests

You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum
Untitled Document


Untitled Document


Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group :: Style based on FI Subice by phpBBservice.nl :: All times are UTC + 10 hours