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Post Posted: Tue Jul 10, 2018 9:46 am 
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Is there an easy way to check whether a GV I'm interested in has an OBDII plug installed - without physically sticking my head in the car, as I'm a long way from it?

The car is a SWB 2001 car, with - supposedly - twin airbags etc. (So maybe an update interior, but I've no clue when they appeared).

Or did Suzuki only equip later GVs with OBDII diag capability?

Thanks in advance.

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Post Posted: Tue Jul 10, 2018 1:03 pm 
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2001 will almost certainly be OBD I, not II. The plugs are the same and will look something like this:

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OBDII refers to a later coding protocol (at least this is how I understand it). OBDI will need a reader which supports OBDI. HOWEVER!! while nearly the entire world come to an agreement on OBDI protocol so they’re all to a particular standard, Australia did not.

This allowed the vehicle manufacturers to design whatever communication protocols they liked in an attempt to presumably make themselves the only ones who had a tool that could read it and restrict cars from being serviced and repaired anywhere except the dealerships.

I have a reader which complies with OBDI and OBDII readers (in the rest of the world) however I cannot yet use it to read Australian OBDI vehicles such as Suzuki Baleno ‘00’s. Harrumpphh

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Post Posted: Tue Jul 10, 2018 1:14 pm 
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I just added a OBD2 reader to my zook. When doing the research I did come across a few sites that listed what vehicles have the OBD2 protocol. Here is one link that I just went back and found:

https://www.elite-electronics.com.au/List_of_ODB2_cars_in_Australia

And here is a page that shows when OBD2 compliance occurred by country - Oz is listed twice 2006 & 2007 (I assume there is a typo and one year is for diesel and one for petrol).
https://www.scantool.net/blog/how-do-i-know-whether-my-car-is-obd-ii-compliant/

interestingly, taken from that page But my car has the 16-pin OBD connector, shouldn't it be OBD-II compliant?

No, not necessarily. A lot of European and Asian manufacturers equipped their vehicles with D-shaped 16-pin connectors long before they began installing OBD-II systems on those vehicles. One curious thing to note here is the fact that most non-EOBD compliant vehicles had a DLC that does not fully conform to SAE J1979. Compare figures 2 and 3, and notice the "ears" on the non-EOBD compliant Ford Focus.


This means that even if you got in the car and saw the plug, it might not connect to anything that you will be able to use.


Last edited by HamiHarr on Tue Jul 10, 2018 1:27 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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Post Posted: Tue Jul 10, 2018 1:19 pm 
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Correct. The early efi vitara has the 16 pin socket with (I recall) one wire going to it.

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Post Posted: Tue Jul 10, 2018 2:24 pm 
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It's an interesting one.

Yes, Australia "ostensibly" went OBDII from '06-'07 on, but earlier cars had readable implementations of it. For example, we had a 2000-model Falcon ute (AUII), which has the appropriate plug, AND your standard ELM327 reader from ebay would plug into it etc. However, most generic code-reading software wouldn't communicate with it. Eventually, I "found" a product called "Forscan" (cue crude alternative wordings), which was written specifically to decipher proprietary Ford "language", and I was able to generate/clear codes in that car. Used it, for example, to diagnose a faulty left rear ABS sensor. $110 on ebay, and 15 minutes to R and R. (Compare that to a dealer diagnosing and fixing the issue).

I guess I was hoping for something similar for the Vitara, should we purchase it. i.e. maybe someone out there has created some software capable of reading Suzuki's own proprietary vehicle "language", whether OBDI or II...

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Post Posted: Tue Jul 10, 2018 3:03 pm 
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#rhinopower http://www.rhinopower.org/

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Post Posted: Thu Jul 12, 2018 2:39 am 
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My 1999 GV SQ625 has an OBD11 style plug, but generic scan gauge / scan tools won't talk to it & even when you find something that does talk to the car, the info available out of the car is not a comprehensive as it is with OBD11.
Rgs, Michael

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Post Posted: Thu Jul 12, 2018 10:03 am 
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Gwagensteve wrote:
Correct. The early efi vitara has the 16 pin socket with (I recall) one wire going to it.


I'd like to think it has four wires - pins 4 & 5 are ground, pin 16 is +12V switched, and pin 9, which would have been the SDL line - early Swifts were wired like this , but the SDL wire went nowhere, even the carbed models had the connector - I remember trying to understand why the diagnostics would not work, and then it dawned on me - you can't talk to the ECU on a vehicle that doesn't have one.

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Post Posted: Thu Jul 12, 2018 11:01 am 
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I’ll take a photo over the weekend.

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Post Posted: Thu Jul 12, 2018 12:28 pm 
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Quote:
OBDII refers to a later coding protocol (at least this is how I understand it). OBDI will need a reader which supports OBDI. HOWEVER!! while nearly the entire world come to an agreement on OBDI protocol so they’re all to a particular standard, Australia did not.


Something I want to point out here ...

OBD-I is not a standard, it's actually a generic term that is commonly used to refer to any vehicle's "on board diagnostic" system that predated OBD-II, which is a US federal standard that was used as a model when many other countries drafted their standards - to say that the entire world or nearly the entire world came to an agreement on OBD-I is incorrect - the majority of manufacturers using EFI systems had proprietary OBD systems which were incompatible with one another, and this is what led to the US department of transportation mandating a single standard that would simplify testing of emission control systems, regardless of the make of the vehicle, not for fault finding, but to ensure that they were functional - so called smog testing.

Suzuki's OBD-I implementation is not compatible with Mitsubishi's, which is not compatible with Toyota's - Toyota actually has several different and incompatible "pre-OBD-II" diagnostic systems - these are the ones I have personal experience with, and I've also seen GM's ALDL (Assembly Line Diagnostic Link) which is their OBD-I system.

EOBD - the European standard and JOBD - the Japanese standard are both "supersets" of the US OBD-II standard in that they encompass every thing that OBD-II does and more, another way to put that is to say that they are backward compatible. I believe the Australian standard is also a superset.

One of the causes of confusion stems from the fact that when governments passed regulations requiring an implementation of an OBD-II or an equivalent standard by a given date, manufacturers who were building vehicles for the US market were free to implement the same technology they were using on their US market vehicles, in those markets at any date prior to the specified date.

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Post Posted: Mon Jul 16, 2018 3:02 pm 
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Just for reference. Here's my 1991 LWB G16B Vitara OBD plug. Not one wire, not 4 either. It's factory complete and unmodified.

Image

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Post Posted: Tue Jul 17, 2018 9:41 am 
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How many "cavities" (spaces to take a connector pin) does that housing have - is it the 16 pin or a 12 pin?

I'm going to guess 12 pin, with this pin out...

Image

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Post Posted: Tue Jul 17, 2018 11:09 am 
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I reckon that’s it.

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